Dreams, Desires, and Discipline

Posted by on March 10, 2013 in Parent Resources | Comments Off on Dreams, Desires, and Discipline

“What do you want to be when you grow up?”

As children, we were all asked this question. How did you answer? Did you enthusiastically shout “Astronaut!” “Dancer!” “Lawyer!” or “Doctor!” Lots of kids do just that. When we’re young, nothing seems impossible. We dare to Dream.

As adults, many of us are still trying to figure out what we want to be “when we grow up.”

“Many adults go through their entire working lives without ever making fully intentional, fully informed career choices. Too many end up in jobs through happenstance rather than informed choice, then spend 50 percent of their conscious hours in work settings they do not particularly enjoy.” (“Career Management Skills: Keys to a Great Career and a Great Life,” Phillip S. Jarvis.)

Why does this happen?

At Find Your Wings, we believe this happens for one primary reason. At some point in our development, we just stopped dreaming.

Somewhere along the way, we stopped believing that incredible things could happen and that we could have the career of our dreams—a career that evolves and continually fuels our passion, creates energy, and makes wonderful use of our gifts. But this doesn’t have to be the case for your child

Do you want your child to be happy and feel a part of the choices he makes regarding his future?

Do you want to invest wisely in higher-education dollars?

Do you want your child to feel good about herself and who she is as a person?

If you answered yes to just ONE of those questions, youth career development should be on your radar screen and the possibility of the Find Your Wings method of Dreams, Desires, and Discipline at your school, your community organization, or your church.

What do we do?

Created by Helen Richardson, a nationally recognized speaker and organizational consultant, and inspired by the life and legacy of Tuskegee Airman Dr. Eugene Richardson, Find Your Wings provides career development to youth ages 10 through 18, including:

  • Career exploration and planning workshops,
  • Career camp on a college campus,
  • Career presentations/speeches, and
  • Workshops for parents to better support their child’s career development.

The approach is holistic and from the inside out, offering youth a safe and fun environment in which to explore their likes, dislikes, multiple intelligences, and talents. Our goal is to capture that moment in time when kids aren’t afraid to dream and leverage it into a fantastic reality.

Common wisdom would have us thinking that career exploration is unnecessary for young people because they have plenty of time to “figure it all out” after they graduate from high school.

But studies show that it’s never too early for youth to begin planning their careers. The author of “Bad College Advice—The Undeclared Major,” states, “Going to college as an undeclared major often leads to students having to spend extra semesters or years in college to get the classes that they need for the major that they eventually choose. Often those students take on more debt as a result.”

At Find Your Wings, we believe there is another way. A better way. Contact us today and start your child on an incredible journey of dreaming, learning, and exploration that will equip him or her with the career planning tools to last a lifetime!

THE BACK STORY

Eugene Richardson’s career started with a dream. During a trip to the Colored Air Circus in Mansfield, Ohio in 1931, a young Richardson became captivated by the black aviators. His desire to fly was sparked right then and there and later given form when at the age of seventeen he took and passed the test to qualify for pilot training in the Army Air Corps. Eugene’s career is legendary, and he has traveled the world sharing his inspiring story. Eugene believes that great things happen when you hold fast to the three D’s—Dreams, Desire, and Discipline. He’s a living testimony to this philosophy, which is woven throughout the Find Your Wings model created by Helen Richardson.